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jtotheizzoe:

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

This is the most adorable experiment that has ever been done.

(via flamingretardant)

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yesiplaytheviola:

emildeville:

my day


Genuinely my life.  Must try harder.

yesiplaytheviola:

emildeville:

my day

Genuinely my life. Must try harder.

  • Me: But I have about fifty books at home I haven't read, there's no reason for me to buy these.
  • My brain: Okay, but consider this: more books.

(Source: htadojeremy, via urbanteddy)

senjukannon:

gloriousbacon:

Cyber-psychologist Berni Goode talking about Flow on Charlie Brooker’s How Videogames Changed the World.

Flow is extremely important. So, so important.

It’s what keeps some people sane. It’s what drives the world’s most skilled and accomplished athletes, the most intense gamers, the hardcore hobbyists, even many of the most talented artists, musicians and actors - flow is what you get when unstoppable drive meets an unflinching will and unlimited dedication.

Flow is being utterly, truly “in the zone”. And it’s one of the most amazing feelings there is. 

This is why finding a sport, or a hobby, or a martial art, or a handicraft, or a new video game, or any skill-based activity that uses focus and requires practice and repetition is so beneficial for things like depression and anxiety and overall mental/physical well-being.

(Source: midnight-sarcasm, via flamingretardant)

staff:

envoya:

this must be what tumblr looks like irl

this is exactly what tumblr looks like irl

staff:

envoya:

this must be what tumblr looks like irl

this is exactly what tumblr looks like irl

(via samewordsdifferentorder)

The problem with depression is

lifeaccordingtohan:

-You know you’ll be ok, but you still feel awful.
-You know people love you, but it doesn’t feel like they do.
-You know doing something will make you feel better, but you just don’t know how to.
-You want to be well, but you just can’t seem to get there.

(via neuroxin)